Posted by: jhamon | August 5, 2009

FDIC In Deep 김치 (Kimchi)

Just the other day I posted about the FDIC’s problem in a post called “FDIC On Fumes, Or Carl Icahn Might Be Wrong This Time.”

A good friend sent this along (thanks, Craig B.!), written by Bud Conrad, Chief Economist for the Casey Report.  Conrad writes:

As we all know, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) guarantees depositors that they’ll get their money back if a bank fails, at least up to a certain amount. To fund its operations, the FDIC collects small fees from the banks that are held in reserve for the purpose of taking over troubled banks and paying off depositors.

Since the Great Depression, a period marked by widespread runs on banks, the FDIC has done a good job of fulfilling its mandate. So how are they doing in this crisis?

In a nutshell, they are in trouble.

The FDIC insures 8,246 institutions, with $13.5 trillion in assets. Not all of them are going bankrupt, of course. Yet as of late July, a disturbing 64 banks had gone belly up this year – the most since 1992 – costing the FDIC $12.5 billion. At the end of Q1, the agency was already asking for emergency funding.

And worse, much worse, is likely yet to come. The following chart shows the total assets on the books of the FDIC’s list of 305 troubled banks. The list doesn’t include the biggest banks that are considered too big to fail, as they are being separately supported with bailouts. By contrast, if the banks on this list fail, the FDIC is on the hook to have to step in and take them over and, of course, make depositors whole.

Other measures of how serious the losses at banks are becoming can be seen in the chart below, which shows charge-offs and non-current loans at all banks. You can see that the Net Charge-offs remain stubbornly high, with banks charging off almost $40 billion in bad loans in the last two quarters alone. And the number of non-current loans – loans where payments are not being kept up – is soaring.

Together, these measures indicate the potential for more big failures and more big bailouts coming down the pike.

 

In summary: The FDIC is in deep 김치 (kimchi).  Read the rest here.

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Responses

  1. It’s like Iceland times a thousand! 😦

    • Indeed.


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